The Tail End

In 1940, Bantam was nearing the end of its run, but the factory kept improving the cars until the very end.  You would think the factory would have just cranked out cars with whatever parts they had left, but no; that wasn’t the Bantam way.  There is a list of improvements throughout the cars which range from the braking system to the clutch lining mounting.  Some of the 1940 drawings, at least the early ones still exist, but many of the later ones appear to have vanished.  Many of these improved components are hidden safely from the environment by aluminum or steel casings, but some were exposed to heat, salt, water, and inexperienced mechanics; so some can be verified by observing original components while other original bits have been entirely lost.

For over a year, I have been trying to pursue the final improvement to the Bantam exhaust system exclusive to late 65 series cars, a tail pipe that exited out of the side of the car ahead the rear rear wheel. (See AABC Authenticity Manual, at section 249 (2nd Ed.)).  While this may sound exotic and make you think of mid-sixties Corvettes, this setup was not executed nearly as suggestively.   While the Authenticity Manual describes the pipe, it has been very difficult finding out the exact shape of the pipe as well as the exhaust hanger.  Below is a photo from the internet of a nicely done 1940 Riviera showing off its new looking side exit exhaust.

1940 Riviera side exit exhaust

This is a sharp car isn’t it? The person who restored this car should be very proud!

There is a company in Michigan, Waldron’s Exhaust, which sells a stainless steel American Bantam (and presumptively Austin) exhaust system.  However, their setup features slightly larger tubing than the original and only exits at the rear of the car.  This is fantastic news for a majority of Bantam owners, but what about those of us working on the latest and greatest Bantams?

Well, late last week, this crate of wonders came in:

20180611_161803.jpgWhile not quite the lost ark from Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Arc, this large crate was chock full of parts from a late 1940 Bantam Deluxe Coupe.  I had a decent idea of some of the other parts which were supposed to be inside, but after ferociously unpacking it I came across this pleasant surprise:

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This website still directs to TrustInRust.com.

It looks like a rusted piece of junk but it is an original side exit tailpipe and hanger from a 53,000 mile original 1940 Bantam coupe which was parked in the 50’s.  Perhaps information on this unit is out there, but I wasn’t able to find it.  So far as I know, this is one of a very few original tail pipes left.

So what does this mean?  Does it mean we will suddenly start reproducing these bits?  Not necessarily.  There are quite a few other reproduction efforts ahead of this one, however it will be cataloged and preserved to ensure that other enthusiasts have access to the information necessary to pursue economy car perfection.  If you are restoring a 1940 Bantam and need information regarding this unit, feel free to contact us to see how we can help.  This is another way in which we hope to help you build a better Bantam.

I bet you’re wondering what else was in that crate…

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Building a Better Bantam Foreword

It has been a bit too long since I have actually done anything substantive on the Shop Project, the Sportsman.  However, the same does not hold true for this website as a whole and the services offered here.  As you know, this website was originally built to make sure that good leads of cars for sale would not die at their expiration.  In nearly four years, this simple site has grown into so much more than that.  With small strides, we are moving into numerous service which you can learn more about by perusing the tabs above.  However, this post is dedicated to building a better Bantam.

What does this Better Bantam phrase mean? Why does the title have foreword in it?  Those are good questions and I’m glad you asked.  I’ll start with the easy one first.  The Foreword is an indication that I am planning to post many more entries under this category.  If you enjoy them and see some utility here, feel free to let me know by following or even emailing me; this way I’ll be a bit more compelled to keep them going.

As to the meaning of the phrase, these posts will be dedicated to not only our efforts but those of other enthusiasts who are seeking to keep the torch burning for American Austins and Bantams.  Unlike the Shop Project posts which work through a specific car at a time, one step at a time, these entries will be not be so strict in their content and order.  Some entries will show you how new parts are being created that overcome the deficiencies of the originals and are intended to outshine their original counterparts in every way.  Other posts will demonstrate simple improvements that may make these 1,200 lb wonders more enjoyable to drive.  A better Bantam is more endurable, more roadworthy, more fun, and easier to repair.  These posts will be introduce you to parts reproduction efforts, technical tips, and improvements for these cars overall; hopefully including photos, videos, and attention capturing content.

The point of these entries will be to chronicle this flourishing hobby and to give you a glimpse into its unique nature.  Seeing how owners and enthusiasts around the world are contributing to the longevity of these cars may be both eye opening and inspirational.  I’ll give a few posts a go, but I welcome your input and contributions.

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Have a great evening!